Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity moschino love  fashion wallpaper 21

Long gone are the days when Moschino used to fill the catwalks with colour. That old trend gives now place to monochromatic pieces, but the absence is nonetheless compensated with striking details and gorgeous accessories.

Moschino’s collection for the new season – Autumn/Winter 2013 – presents a triple variety of options, each one of them keeping the classiness and sophistication the brand has always been known for.

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity Moschino collection Fall Winter 2012 20132

At the Milan Fashion Week, Franco Moschino’s brand elected white, blue, black, pink, red and gold – not together, as I said – as the colours of the feminine collection of the season. A collection whose keyword is “irreverence”, one may venture: skirts and dresses invariably above the knee, spangles and a great deal of leather. Only the soft make-up and the bows on their hair give the models a kind of a girly style.

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity Moschino collection Fall Winter 2012 2013 22

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity Moschino collection Fall Winter 2012 2013 31

There is another proposal that will suit those who are thinking about taking a snow vacation perfectly. Creating a bound between sport and country-style chic, this part of the collection is strongly eye-catching, not only because of its unusual design and vivid colours, but also because of the beautiful Ymre Stiekema and Ophelie Rupp, the faces of the campaign.

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity Moschino collection Fall Winter 2012 2013 41

Baroque miscellany in chromatic simplicity Moschino collection Fall Winter 2012 2013 71

Last but not least, Moschino’s new collection shows the brand’s ability to follow the newest trends by taking its inspiration from past centuries’ baroque style. Unlike other brands, searching for themes, shapes, colours and so on in the last few decades, Moschino tries to get back the “excess” that used to characterize the various forms of art in the 16th, 17th, 18th centuries, applying it to fashion. Golden details, especially embroideries – a reminiscence of the architectonical traceries – and a great diversity of elements emerge as a result.

 

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