Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon

Jinhyun Jeon, a graduate of the Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli as part of her MA thesis about the relationship between food and the senses.

Can the shape, texture and colour of cutlery change the way food tastes? That’s the main question behind this set of knobbly, bulbous and serrated cutlery to stimulate diners’ full range of senses at the table.

Jinhyun Jeon, graduated in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli to analyze the relationship between food and the senses. Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you

Jinhyun Jeon, graduated in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli to analyze the relationship between food and the senses. Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you3

Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon banner new catalogue covet lounge

Jinhyun Jeon, graduated in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli to analyze the relationship between food and the senses. Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you4

The project was inspired by the phenomenon of synesthesia, a neurological condition in which stimuli like taste, colour and hearing are affected and triggered by each other. People with synesthesia often report seeing a certain colour when they hear a particular word, for example.

To find out whether this “sensory cross-wiring” could be encouraged and used to enhance taste, Jeon created cutlery based on five sensory elements: colour, tactility, temperature, volume and weight, and form.

The ceramic pieces shown here explore the effects of colour, with various coloured glazes defining the tips of each implement. Warm colours such as red and orange are supposed to increase appetite, says Jeon, and are most effective when used sparingly.

Jinhyun Jeon, graduated in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli to analyze the relationship between food and the senses. Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you5

Jinhyun Jeon, graduated in the Netherlands, made Sensorial cutlery as Sensorial Stimuli to analyze the relationship between food and the senses. Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you6

Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you7

Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon bl coolors collection 750

Sensorial cutlery Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon Sensorial cutlery by Jinhyun Jeon arts and crafts I Lobo you8

Other pieces are made from stainless steel, silver or plastic, and the various textures and shapes are intended to stimulate the sense of touch inside the mouth.

The plastic pieces resemble glass, which creates a jarring sensation for the user when the item’s appearance is incongruous with its feel. “We tend to believe our sight and touch would be the same, but this is not the whole story. “The tools I created make us focus on each bite, feel the enriched textures or enhanced chewing sounds between bites,” “If we can stretch the borders of what tableware can do, the eating experience can be enriched.”

A return to primal and intense experiences is brewing in the world of art and design. It is clear that we are searching for multi-sensory and experiential stimuli which give us something all-encompassing and rich, rather than the mundane tasks of our daily lives. The rise of synaesthetic projects is evidence of this desire.

See also Contemporary tableware by Suite one Studio HERE!

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